Frank Schaeffer on how the Republicans played Christian conservatives for fools.

From here: Insider: “The Christian Right is Aiming to Destroy All Things Public”

The price for the Religious Right’s wholesale idolatry of private everything was that Christ’s reputation was tied to a cynical union-busting political party owned by billionaires. It only remained for a Far Right Republican- appointed majority on the Supreme Court to rule in 2010 that unlimited corporate money could pour into political campaigns— anonymously—in a way that clearly favored corporate America and the superwealthy, who were now the only entities served by the Republican Party.

The Evangelical foot soldiers never realized that the logic of their ‘stand’ against government had played into the hands of people who never cared about human lives beyond the fact that people could be sold products. By the twenty-first century, Ma and Pa No-name were still out in the rain holding an “Abortion is Murder!” sign in Peoria and/or standing in line all night in some godforsaken mall in Kansas City to buy a book by Sarah Palin and have it signed. But it was the denizens of the corner offices at Goldman Sachs, the News Corporation, Koch Industries, Exxon, and Halliburton who were laughing.

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One Response to Frank Schaeffer on how the Republicans played Christian conservatives for fools.

  1. This is the oldest game in the book, DV8. Folks now and then point to Paul’s endorsement of the established socio-political order of his day and — sometimes — grasp that the incestuous relationship in which religion endorses and supports the state is at least a couple thousand years old. But it is thousands of years older than that. It can be strongly argued that the very first states in history — the ancient Sumerarian states — embodied and relied on that relationship. The temple and the palace have always been joined at the hip. And the rich of each day eventually take over both institutions, making the relationship socioeconomically incestuous.

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